HYPE HYPE HYPE: Gospel’s The Moon is a Dead World is being reissued.

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The Moon is a Dead World is one of the greatest albums ever made. It blew me away upon release, and it continues to do so to this day. It’s something of a shame, though, that this classic of progressive post-hardcore has been out of print since, well, since the wonderful Level Plane Records closed. At the time of writing, CD copies on Discogs are going for over £20; and vinyl for over £60. Sure, it might be on Spotify, but that’s no substitute for actually having a copy that sounds the way the album should, and I’ve been hoping for years that someone would reissue it. Well, good news, because the wonderful people at Repeater Records are reissuing the album on vinyl, with pre-orders starting on Friday 12th October.

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Five of the Best: Level Plane Records Releases

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That Level Plane Records is no more is nothing short of a tragedy. Between 1997 and 2009, the label released some of the best underground punk, hardcore, screamo, metal, and everything in-between. Originally set up simply so Greg Drudy had an address to put on the back of the first Saetia 7″, the impact and influence the label would go on to have upon the underground scene was huge. Some of these records have been re-issued by other labels – with special praise being given to The Archivist label for getting so many on Bandcamp – but some might require searching on Discogs or eBay.

As such, limiting this list down to only five releases has been rather painful. There’s so many I wanted to include – so many records of superb quality, so many that meant so much to me, and still do – but there’s a reason this series is called Five of the Best, not Twenty of the Best. So, here we go. Feel free to tell me what I missed or what your favourite records from this excellent label are. Enjoy!

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Review: Siavash Amini & Matt Finney – Gospel

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Label: Opal Tapes

Gospel is the third collaboration (though second to be released) between Siavash Amini and Matt Finney, and the combination of ambient/drone soundscapes and confessional spoken word is every bit as emotionally devastating as you’d hope and expect. It’s not a record to be enjoyed in any conventional sense of the word; instead, it’s music as therapy, as a means of confronting one’s demons and trying to put the past behind you, no matter how Sisyphean a task that may seem. It picks up the thread (both musically and emotionally) from Familial Rot and not so much runs with it as it does stumble forward, hands reaching desperately for safety, fighting off demons and trauma that are more spiritual than anything else. It is a haunting, uncomfortable listen; but also compelling in its own way.

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